New FDA approved test can check for coronary heart disease

New FDA approved test can check for coronary heart disease

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved a new test that will be able to check for factors known to lead to coronary heart disease. According to an FDA press release, the evaluation has been approved for use in all adults with no previous history of cardiac disease. The organization believes the test will be most effective in identifying risk in women, particularly those who are African-American. 

Know your risk level
The test, known as the PLAC Test, looks at the activity of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) in the blood of patients. The release noted that Lp-PLA2 is a biological indicator for vascular inflammation. This condition results from excessive plaque buildup in the arteries that help supply blood to the heart. If this buildup continues over time, arteries can become narrowed and people can develop coronary heart disease. When patients undergo the examin and receive results that their Lp-PLA2 activity is greater than the level of 225 nanomoles per minute per milliliter, they are at an elevated risk for coronary heart disease events, which includes heart attacks. 

Do you know your coronary heart disease risk? A new test could tell you.

According to NBC News, this test could prove beneficial for many people with less-than-ideal heart health. Since heart disease is the top killer of Americans, doctors typically run a number of tests, from cholesterol evaluations to blood pressure exams, on their patients. The PLAC Test, which will soon be available for commercial purchase by physicians, will likely become another routine assessment. 

Trial runs proved informative 
The FDA noted that in order for the test to be approved, a validation study was performed over the course of a few years. A variety of participants, between the ages of 45 and 92 with no history of coronary heart disease, were evaluated using the PLAC Test. Researchers followed the subjects over the course of a few years, noting when any of them experienced a coronary event. Ultimately, it was determined that people who scored higher than 225 nmol/min/mL were 7 percent more likely to have one of these cardiac issues. People with a lower level only had a risk level of 3.3 percent. 

After analyzing the subjects' demographics, researchers determined that women, in particular African-American women, are more likely to have a high score on the exam. Knowing this, doctors can more closely evaluate their patients who fit these descriptions. 

"Heart health exams are certainly beneficial when it comes to knowing where you stand in terms of coronary heart disease risk, but it's important to maintain a lifestyle to keep this risk level as low as possible."

Be conscious about cardiac wellness 
New heart health exams are certainly beneficial when it comes to knowing where you stand in terms of coronary heart disease risk, but it's important to maintain a lifestyle to keep this risk level as low as possible. This includes avoiding dangerous activities like drinking alcohol, doing drugs and smoking cigarettes. Additionally, you should strive to have a regular exercise routine and a healthy diet. 

No heart-boosting diet is complete without omega-3 fatty acids. This essential compound has been shown to reduce bad cholesterol levels and bodily inflammation, two factors that may increase your risk of coronary heart disease. You can consume omega-3s through a number of delicious foods, like salmon, walnuts and kale, or by taking a daily supplement. Omax3 is today's premium supplement, and your best choice for maximum human performance. Created by doctors associated with Yale University, it contains an impressive 91 percent concentrated omega-3 and is sure to be a great addition to your healthy lifestyle. 

Essential takeaways 

  • A new test, known as the PLAC Test, was recently approved by the FDA as a way to measure coronary heart disease risk factors in adults with no history of heart disease. 
  • The test looks at blood levels of Lp-PLA2, which reveals a patient's risk for vascular inflammation, a disorder that can lead to coronary heart disease events. 
  • The FDA hopes that this informative exam will become a routine evaluation used by many doctors. 
  • A study to determine the test's effectiveness discovered that people who got high scores were at a 7 percent higher risk for having a coronary heart disease event.
  • Since many of the people who scored highly on the evaluation were women, in particularly African-American women, the FDA hopes this test will be used by doctors to help this demographic. 
  • Keep your heart strong by maintaining a healthy lifestyle complete with regular omega-3 consumption.