How secondhand smoke could be hurting your heart

How secondhand smoke could be hurting your heart

Chances are, you've read the warning labels and listened to the public service announcements about cigarettes. In order to maintain good health – especially cardiovascular health – you're aware that it's important to ditch the smokes. Did you know that living with a smoker could be extremely damaging to your health as well? Spending time around cigarette smoke can have a plethora of long-term consequences. Take a look at the ways regular inhalation of secondhand smoke could be impacting your body. 

What exactly is secondhand smoke? 
First, it's important to be aware of what exactly constitutes secondhand smoke. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it is either the smoke for a burning cigarette, cigar or pipe, or the smoke breathed out by people using one of these products. Secondhand smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals, 70 of which are known carcinogens. Most people who are regularly exposed to secondhand smoke live or work with smokers. Since smoking is mostly banned in restaurants and other public places, your risk of encountering secondhand smoke in communal areas has decreased. Outdoor venues, casinos and private parties all still hold risks. 

Support your cardiovascular health by avoiding secondhand smoke.

What does it do to your body? 
According to the American Cancer Society, secondhand smoke poses a wide variety of risks to your wellbeing. While you might assume it has the biggest effect on your lungs, its harsh impact on heart health should not be ignored. Every year in the U.S., 42,000 non-smokers die from heart disease associated with regular secondhand smoke exposure. In fact, being around secondhand smoke on a normal basis can raise your risk of developing heart issues by 25 to 30 percent. 

The CDC reported that once inhaled, secondhand smoke immediately starts to damage your heart. If you already have cardiovascular issues caused by other factors, being around smoke could rapidly worsen your condition. The Mayo Clinic noted that the chemicals present in cigarette smoke cause your arteries to become inflamed, which may lead to a heart attack. They also cause the number of platelets in your blood to increase, which can put you at a higher risk for developing blood clots. Excess clotting can lead to a stroke or heart attack. 

How can you reduce your exposure?

"Reducing your exposure to secondhand smoke is an important step toward improving your cardiovascular health."

If you live with smokers, it's important that you encourage them to quit. They're probably aware they aren't doing their own health any favors, but they may not know just how  much of an impact their habit is having on their loved ones. Once you've made your home a smoke-free environment, focus on avoiding smoky public places in favor of cigarette-free options. 

Reducing your exposure to secondhand smoke is an important step toward improving your cardiovascular health. Additionally, it's important to exercise and eat a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids. This nutritious compound has been shown to reduce bodily inflammation, which is vital for reducing your risk of developing heart disease. An easy way to consume your daily dose of omega-3s is through the premium supplement Omax3. Containing 91 percent concentrated omega-3 fatty acids, it's your best choice for maximum human performance. 

Essential takeaways 

  • Although you're probably aware of the health risks associated with smoking cigarettes, it's important to know how secondhand smoke exposure affects your body as well. 
  • Secondhand smoke comes from burning cigars, pipes or cigarettes, or is exhaled by people using these items. 
  • Being regularly exposed to secondhand smoke greatly damages your cardiovascular health. 
  • In addition to avoiding smoky environments, keep your heart strong by consuming plenty of omega-3 fatty acids like those found in Omax3. 
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