Homing signal in brains reveals how humans navigate

Homing signal in brains reveals how humans navigate

Researchers at University College London recently published a study in Current Biology revealing that humans have a "homing signal" in their brains. This signal, the study argues, is the reason some people have a good sense of direction, while others find navigating to be quite difficult. 

How's your internal compass?
For the study, scientists took brain scans of 16 people as they attempted to navigate their way through various landscapes on a computer. They were looking to see what parts of the participants' brains were most active when they were trying to find their way. According to the results, the brain's entorhinal region showed the most activity when people were trying to choose a direction.

While there had been speculation for years that this part of the brain had a type of "homing signal," this research confirms that it plays a key role when it comes to navigation instincts. The strength of signals from this region could be the reason some people have a natural sense of direction while other people struggle with direction. 

Your natural sense of direction could depend on signals from your brain's entorhinal region.

"Our results provide evidence to support the idea that your internal 'compass' readjusts as you move through the environment. For example, if you turn left then your entorhinal region should process this to shift your facing direction and goal direction accordingly," stated Martin Chadwick, Ph.D., lead author of the study.

Notably, this is the first part of the brain that is affected when it comes to chronic memory loss. Researchers believe that this is part of the reason people experiencing memory loss often get lost. They also hope that this study could serve to identify symptoms of cognitive decline in the early stages. 

Point your brain's health in the right direction
In order to avoid memory loss and keep your brain strong and healthy, it's important to be mindful of your overall lifestyle, including diet and exercise. Staying physically fit is a crucial part of staying in

"In order to avoid memory loss and keep your brain strong and healthy, it's important to be mindful of your overall lifestyle."

good mental shape. In addition to creating a healthy routine of cardiovascular and strength activities, make sure you're eating foods that support cognitive wellness. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, omega-3 fatty acids are one of the most important compounds you should be consuming for proper brain function and memory strength.

In addition to foods like salmon and walnuts, you can get your daily dose of omega-3s by taking a supplement. Omax3 is the premium supplement available on today's market, containing 91 percent concentrated omega-3. When you're looking to improve your performance and support your health, choose Omax3. 

Essential takeaways

  • Researchers at University College London found that people have a "homing signal" in their brains that contributes to their sense of direction. 
  • After reviewing brain scans of 16 people as they attempted navigation, scientists determined that the brain's entorhinal region is the source of directional skills. 
  • This is also the first part of the brain weakened by chronic memory loss. 
  • In order to support a healthy brain, make sure to eat a diet rich in omega-3s, like those found in Omax3 capsules.